Doing Business with Turkey

What You Need to Know about Doing Business with Turkey

Import Exporting Turkey

As we continue our series on the rising economies of the MINT countries, this month’s focus is on Turkey.  Situated at the crossroads of Europe and Asia, Turkey has long been a significant market for international commerce and continues to enjoy the benefits of its location as the trend of globalization continues.  It’s no surprise that Southern Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia are all vital markets that benefit from Turkey’s infrastructure, manufacturing and trade. 

As a NATO member, Turkey offers an environment that is both politically and environmentally friendly to the United States.  In 2013, U.S. exports to Turkey were valued at $12.1 billion while imports stood at $6.7 billion.  The combined two way trade makes Turkey America’s 37th largest trading partner.  U.S. exports to Turkey, aside from agricultural products, consist primarily of Mineral Oil, Iron & Steel, Aircraft, Industrial Machinery, Cotton Yarn and Fabric. 

Despite offering a friendly trade environment, it’s important to know that Turkish customs has very strict and difficult procedures to adhere to.  Shipments have been known to sit in Turkish government facilities for periods as long as a year simply due to discrepancies in documentation.  U.S. exporters should be keenly aware of the requirements their goods are subject to as a lack of compliance can potentially eliminate opportunity to realize profitable sales.  CTAAgricultural and food products are subject to the highest levels of scrutiny as they require importers to obtain a Control Certificate from the Turkish Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs.  Over the years, we have taken on many customers who experienced tremendous difficulties as their logistics providers did not take the time to plan shipments in close coordination with Turkish customs.  To simply rush the goods out the door without planning for customs delays and objections is a recipe for disaster. 

For commercial goods, outside of the agriculture and foods sector, exporters must ensure that their shipments are properly prepared. They must be accompanied by bills of lading, packing lists and commercial invoices.  We cannot stress the importance of accuracy with your invoices.  Turkish Customs can withhold the release of goods for any discrepancies or irregularities in commercial invoices such as misspellings, discrepancies between commercial invoices and packing lists, improper calculations or tallies on invoices, and other such mistakes.  Exporters who are shipping samples of their products to prospective customers should exercise extra caution as “zero value” invoices will almost never be released by Turkish customs.  “Zero Value” invoices essentially list the product being shipped as an invoice of no commercial value, and from the standpoint of the exporter and importer this is factual.  However, Turkish Customs (and in fact many customs agencies around the world) see this as an attempt to circumvent duties and other taxes which can cause product to be impounded and destroyed.  At the very least this can present a disruption to a marketer’s business process, but more importantly the cost of shipping, storage and potential penalties and fines can cause significant financial losses.  A client of ours once tried to ship a powdered beverage mix to Turkey using one of the global courier companies, but without proper advisement on how to prepare the material, found their product (tons of it actually were being sent over for R&D testing purposes) held up by Turkish customs for nearly 6 months without any corrective action being offered to resolve the matter.  We couldn’t help them with the batch of material that got stuck in Turkish customs, but were able to prevent future mishaps by setting up a process that ensured proper customs compliance well before departure of the goods.  

From a transportation and logistics perspective Turkey is developing its infrastructure at a rapid pace.  Recent government funded projects include investments in tunnels connecting the country’s Asian and European cities, expansion of ports, and the national airline is on track to become the world’s largest airline.  As a result, U.S. exporters will find no shortage of transportation options available for delivery of their export sales.

With a projected economic growth rate of 4% per year, and a growing entrepreneurial class, Turkey offers excellent growth potential.  With a population of nearly 75 million, it is also one of the largest countries in the Middle East and hence boasts a very strong domestic market that will continue to be a source of opportunities for U.S. made goods.    

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